Amanda Greenwood 31/05/12 7:32 PM

One thing I love about this time of year is that I get to order next season collections from international designers.  I was absolutely blown away when I came across pricing for sizing. Price per size is the act of charging extra for sizes outside of the average.

Many Designers price according to size, charging a flat rate for average sizes and a premium for bigger sizes. Most add $5.00 to their wholesale price.

measure tummy image

So here’s my dilemma.

In my opinion, "body changes" are a primary driver of sales. Our customers are sensitive to the changes in their body. So often we see tears in this business where ladies of all sizes (but often more shapely - somewhere) have had a really hard time finding maternity wear that fits, looks great and they are proud to be seen in.  

Imagine how that mum2be feels when she puts on those trousers that actually fit her hip or that top that finally fits comfortably over her bust.  Got that image? Happy, smiling, sunny skies, birds chirping etc... great now, imagine her face when I tell her that because she couldn't squeeze into a size 16, I am forced to charge her an extra $5. Talk about build her up then drop her down.  In a world where we are so sensitive to, well, everything. Why is it ok to be so rude and insensitive to a woman who is doing the best she can in what should be a wonderful time in her life.  How is that encouraging any form of self pride and embracing her new baby body. How is that ensuring she enjoys her pregnancy experience, as every mum2be deserves to do.

I understand that a larger size garment takes additional fabric.  I just don't agree in charging additional fees for the privilege of selling that garment to a customer.  Looking at the big picture, are they really going to feel the impact of that additional fabric cost?   

So to me this just isn't rocket science. Perhaps I am simplifying it all too much. There are three choices available to Designers/warehouses.

1. Suck it up and wear the additional expense of those few metres of fabric.  
2. Average the costs of that additional fabric over all of the garments produced for the season and therefore cover your expenses without making it obvious. Surely the increase would be minimal.
3. (I am not a fan of this however many designers do it) just don't offer the larger sizes. Rather than insult customers, just don't offer it.

Oh, as retailer there is always the option of the Retailer or store owner absorbing that additional fee. Which is what Angelbub and many others choose to do.

What do you think? Would you pay a premium for a larger dress size?